Sequence 1: Stem cell understanding

The role of stem cells in differentiation and development and disruption of the regulation of the cell cycle in the development of disease

The third module within Sequence 1 focuses on developing an understanding of the role stem cells play in differentiation and development and the potential for disruption of this process leading to the development of disease.

VCE key knowledge (VCAA 2015)

Cell growth and differentiation (Unit 2, Area of Study 1, Outcome 1, VCE Biology Study Design)

  • the consequences of stem cell differentiation in human prenatal development including the development of germ layers, types of tissues formed from germ layers and the distinction between embryo and foetus.
  • the disruption of the regulation of the cell cycle through genetic predisposition or the action of mutagens that gives rise to uncontrolled cell division including cancer and abnormal embryonic development.

Duration

1 - 2 hours

Student learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students will:

  • understand the concept of cellular differentiation and the role of germ layers in tissue and embryonic development.
  • be able to explain the role of stem cells in differentiation and development.
  • be able to describe and explain some of the causes and consequences of disruption to the normal cell cycle.

Teacher background information

The core resources for this sequence are from the: National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia, Teacher’s Kit

Download Stem Cell Teacher’s Kit

Note: Since the Teacher’s Kit was written a number of the links to which it refers have become inactive. It nevertheless remains an excellent resource.

The relevant background reading and activities from this Teacher’s Kit are referenced in the white boxes below. Further background material and alternative activities are highlighted in yellow.

Teacher's Kit (p.24)

Chapter 2 - The different types of stem cells.

An investigation of the two main types of stem cells.

Video

TED-Ed: What are stem cells?

Introductory animation with an easy to understand narration relating to basic stem cell science and the individual. Incorporates eight review questions (also applies to Module 4).

Open
Website (Interactive)

University of Utah: Go Go Stem Cells

Go Go Stem Cells is for students to explore. It includes an introduction to stem cells and brain, blood, hair follicle, bone cell and intestinal cells.

Accompanying this interactive website are teacher resources including:

Open
Video

What is a neural stem cell? Narrated by Dr Sam Weiss

In this Stem Cell Network video the focus is on introducing neural stem cells using animated graphics. Limited detail but suitable for sharing with students who can acquire additional information from other sources.

Open
Video

What is a hematopoietic stem cell? Narrated by Dr Connie Eaves

This Stem Cell Network video uses animated graphics to introduce hematopoietic stem cells. Limited detail is provided, but the video is suitable for sharing with students who can acquire additional information from other sources.

Open
Video

What is a cancer stem cell? Narrated by Dr John Dick

This Stem Cell Network video uses animated graphics to introduce cancer stem cells. Limited detail is provided, but the video is suitable for sharing with students who can acquire additional information from other sources.

Open
Website

National Institutes of Health: The Differentiation Potential of Stem Cells

A detailed resource from the National Institutes of Health, USA that includes an introduction, basic concepts and definitions of stem cells. To assist glossary terms are available by selecting the highlighted words throughout the text. Resource for teachers and students.

Open
Video

Khan Academy: Germ Layers

This Khan Academy video (2:11) summarises germ layer derivatives – endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm.

Open
Website (Videos)

EuroStemCell website: Videos and films

Access to a range of informative and scientific videos and films have been made available by the EuroStemCell organisation.

Highlighted are the following videos:

Open

Activities

Teacher's Kit (pp.51-55)

Activity 2.5 - So what’s so special about stem cells?

This activity focuses on the relationship between stem cells and the development of specialised germ layer tissues in the developing embryo. Students are required to read a passage outlining the process and complete associated questions with a focus on visual representation of responses.

Teacher's Kit (pp.58-61)

Activity 3.1 - Forming an embryo - from egg to blastocyst

This activity focuses on the development of the human embryo from conception, in this case through the process of IVF. Students are required to match the visual stages with a written explanation (also applies to Module 6).

Teacher's Kit (pp.74-82)

Activity 3.5 - How are stem cells specialised into different cell types?

This activity focuses on the process involved in the specialisation of stem cells. Students are required to read an information handout and complete associated questions.

Other potential activities

Activity (PDF)

Embryo Clay Model

This activity explores early embryonic development, differentiation of cells and germ layers though clay modeling. This activity can be modified as required.

Open
Resource

Stem Cell Adventure Comic Book (for student reference)

This alternative resource is provided to teachers as its format may appeal to different students and contains valuable information on the history, science and ethical issues associated with stem cells.

Open
Back to top

Contributors

Thanks to the following for contributing to the development of these sequences:

  • Dr. Elise Roper MTeach student at Deakin University (Pre-Service Teacher Contributor and Collator)
  • Dr. Julie Cooper MTeach student at Deakin University (Pre-Service Teacher Contributor and Collator)
  • Prof. Megan Munsie Policy and Outreach Manager and Head of Education, Ethics, Law & Community Awareness Unit, The University of Melbourne (Stem Cell Scientist)
  • Dr. Peta WhiteDr. Peta White Lecturer in Science and Environmental Education at Deakin University (Education Academic and Project Coordinator)

Special thanks to Olivia Tan MTeach student at Deakin University (Pre-Service Teacher Contributor)